Deliver a killer presentation with these strategies

Several times a year, I deliver a workshop called Preparing Powerful Content for Presentations. It’s a two-day workshop where we look at strategies, techniques and insights on how to create a killer presentation. Essentially, the workshop is all about what you can do from the point you are first asked to give a presentation, to when the slides are finished.

In the workshop, pushback inevitably comes when participants are asked to take a step back and rethink the concept and create a storyline for their presentation based on what they’ve learned. I get responses like ‘I can’t change it. I’ve already delivered the presentation’ or ‘But I’m just preparing the presentation, I’m not delivering it.’

These responses will NOT help to create positive change in your organization.

Trying new concepts to create ‘more’

And so I encourage my participants to start from scratch. Yes, restart the whole thing. Are they happy to do that? Maybe 30% are ready and excited to jump in and start all over again.

But let me tell you, after we finish, 100% of the participants are glad they did!

Something magical happens when you turn off and tune out old ideas, preconceived notions, and perceived limitations. And it’s a joy to see the final result.

Some of the key learning points from my Preparing Powerful Content for Presentations workshop are:

  1. Know the goal

Know exactly what action you want the audience to take when they leave your presentation. Because if you don’t know, they won’t know either. There should always be an action, so push yourself to identify it. I guarantee there is more to your presentation than just ‘informing’. (Can’t figure it out? Get in touch and I’ll help you.)

  1. Create a gap

Create a gap, a pain, an opportunity, between the current situation and the future that could be, if only they take the action you are proposing. Because there IS a gap, there IS a pain point, there IS an opportunity. Otherwise what you want to tell them is of little value.

  1. Show multi-level benefits

Include the benefits of doing something and the risks of not doing something. At each of these levels: society and the environment (possibly), the organization, the department, the individual making the decision. Make sure to address each of those in your presentation content and strategy if you’ve assessed that it’s relevant for your audience.

  1. Get personal

The old adage goes, ‘People buy from people they know, like and trust.’ I take it a step further: People buy from, support, champion, recommend, refer, help and promote people they know, like and trust. Add anecdotes from your experience, empathize because you used to do their job, or show in some other way that you know what it’s like to be in their position.

  1. Inspire action

Inspire your audience with what is possible to be/do/have in the future. Many people are just fine with the way things are, thank you very much. So asking people to take on change can be tough. But if you believe in the change, in yourself, and in their ability to be successful with the change, you can lead them to a better position: in work and very possibly, in life.

Unlimited possibilities

Here’s what you can create:

  • A presentation with an active, compelling concept
  • A clear understanding of who the audience is and what they need from the speaker
  • An engaging storyline that keeps the audience’s attention and takes them on a journey
  • A slide deck that with key messages and supportive images that resonate
  • A clear and explicit action that the audience should take

Create more – for your audience and for yourself. Let us know how these strategies work for you.

Wishing you every success as you prepare powerful content for your presentations!

All the best,

Tracie

Quality Assurance Communication

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Are You Accidentally Making Yourself Look Less Professional?

“I, um, I just wanted to say that, ah, …”

I just came from a presentation given by an expert in their field. Well, the presenter’s bio said they were an expert in the topic. But right from the beginning, I had my doubts. It had nothing to do with content of the presentation and EVERYTHING to do with delivery. You see, I counted 5 ‘um’s and ‘ah’s from the speaker in the first 3 minutes of their presentation. Not a good sign. I knew it was going to be a painful 90 minutes.

You might wonder why I started counting the ‘um’s and ‘ah’s. It comes naturally, from being a Toastmaster. One of the things we do at our Toastmasters meetings, at least at my club, is to count ‘um’s, ‘ah’s and other filler words spoken aloud … by EVERY person attending the meeting.

The Ah Counter, the person spending the entire meeting focusing on this task, reports the number of times – every – single – person – said those words during the meeting. At first it sounds like an awful thing to have done to you: Someone counts your ‘um’s and ‘ah’s and then tells the entire room how many you uttered. Embarrassing!

In fact, it’s a gift. You can no longer live in blissful ignorance of your bad habit. And that’s a good thing. Because once you are aware of your penchant to say ‘um’ and ‘ah’, you become instantly aware of it the next time one of those words comes out of your mouth.

So you can immediately begin to STOP saying them by developing strategies and tips to put in place each time you speak in public. It all starts with awareness. And then you work at it, every time you speak in front of others.

And don’t forget the pride that will result from this: The day the Ah Counter SKIPS your name because you didn’t utter a single ‘um’, ‘ah’, or any other filler word is a great day! That, my friends, is a real moment to celebrate!

You can be THE expert in your field, but your content and your professionalism won’t shine through to your audience if you utter 177 ‘um’s and ‘ah’s in your 87-minute presentation.

Yes, that was the final count during the presentation I watched today: 177 ‘um’s and ‘ah’s. I didn’t bother to count the other filler words. The 177 was bad enough. It was painful for the audience. It was all anyone talked about at the break. But did the speaker even realize they had this habit?

I engaged the speaker during the break, asking a question about the content of the presentation. After a few moments, the speaker asked for some feedback on their presentation. They brought up the topic of the ‘um’s themselves, which created an opening for me introduce ways to overcome them. All in all, it worked out well. The fact that the speaker was already aware of the bad habit to some degree made it easy for us to have the conversation.

Here are some strategies and tips to stop saying filler words that have worked for me and for my clients:

  1. Create an awareness that you say ‘um’, ‘ah’ and other filler words. Have a colleague be your own personal Ah Counter, record yourself, etc.
  2. Know your topic inside and out and know what you want to say inside and out. That way, the information comes out of your mouth with ease and confidence; no searching for what to say next.
  3. Keep your mouth closed. When you are thinking of what to say next, make an effort to keep your mouth closed. When we open our mouths when we are thinking, we tend to utter sounds like ‘um’, ‘ah’ or other filler words.
  4. Choreograph how you will move from idea to idea, slide to slide. That means knowing what comes next, and next, and next in your presentation. You don’t have to memorize a script, but you should know the flow of your presentation by heart. (After all, what would you do if you had no slides??)
  5. Work on your confidence speaking in front of a room. You might even consider joining Toastmasters.

Have an insight, strategy or tip for reducing the number of filler words we say? Please share in the comments below.

Wishing you every success in your public speaking!

All the best,

Tracie

Quality Assurance Communication

PS: Keep an eye out for my open workshops in the Rhein-Neckar region on how to Prepare and Deliver a Dynamic Presentation hosted by the IHK. The next one is in three weeks!

Put Your Dancing Shoes On, It’s Time to Rock the Stage

Preparation is critical to my success, whether I’m delivering a workshop or speaking to a roomful of my ideal clients.  And whenever I get ready to speak in those situations, I like to take a step back and plan my dance moves… I like to call it my ‘choreography’.

This week I’m delivering two Audit Report Writing workshops to a new client. Because it’s the first time I’m delivering a full workshop(s) to them, it’s important that I get it right.

I’ve invested time getting to know the client and their staff, I’ve tailored the training material to their audit methodology, and I’ve gotten the stamp of approval from the Head of Internal Audit to deliver the workshops.

There’s one thing left to do before I go ‘on stage’: make sure I am ready to seamlessly move from one key message to the next, change from one slide to the next, and transition from topic to topic.

Here are 7 of the strategies I use to prepare myself for any presentation or speech, which I share in more detail in my Preparing Powerful Content workshop:

  1. Plan the first section of your presentation carefully. I still do it for my Audit Report Writing workshop, even though I’ve delivered it well over 50 times.
  2. Identify the relevant aspects of your experience and qualifications to resonate with that particular audience. This will create instant credibility during your self-introduction.
  3. Plan the key messages for every slide. Include supporting anecdote/example/comparison, and timing.
  4. Identify the ‘Ah-a moment’ of each slide in the body of your presentation. If there isn’t one, don’t show the slide.
  5. Plan the transitions between slides and topics. Use signposting language to take your audience by the hand with you.
  6. Know what you can cut out per slide and overall. Flexibility is key, and the audience shouldn’t feel that you are cutting anything out even if you are.
  7. Plan your conclusion. Skip the ‘Thank you for your attention’ slide and instead, focus on your main messages and call to action.

Why choreograph your next presentation?

When you are clear on these things, you can deliver with confidence and authenticity. Planning may take you 5 minutes, 50 minutes or 5 hours. Regardless, you will be far more successful, and your audience is much more likely to benefit from your messages if your choreography is mapped out before you put on your dancing shoes and step onto the stage.

Wishing you much success in your next presentation, speech or workshop!

All the best,

Tracie

Quality Assurance Communication

How to Prepare and Deliver a Powerful Presentation: Hosted by the IHK Rhein-Neckar

preparing-delivering-powerful-presentations

October 9 & 10, 2017, in Mannheim, Germany

Change the way you think about, design and deliver presentations to international audiences. Presentation of best practices, discussion, individual and group work, practice delivery of your presentation with trainer and peer feedback.

See more information

On-the-go Business

I really enjoy working with international teams on location. And while I’m looking into other virtual training options, I’m always happy to travel to your location or office and conduct training or workshops for your international teams.

Tracie Marquardt Training and Workshops

 

Where do you prefer to work? Do you work from home or at an office? How often do you travel for your job?

All the best,

Tracie Marquardt

Quality Assurance Communication