The moment you commit and quit holding back

The moment you commit and quit holding back

Tracie Marquardt

Quality Assurance Communication

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Put Your Dancing Shoes On, It’s Time to Rock the Stage

Preparation is critical to my success, whether I’m delivering a workshop or speaking to a roomful of my ideal clients.  And whenever I get ready to speak in those situations, I like to take a step back and plan my dance moves… I like to call it my ‘choreography’.

This week I’m delivering two Audit Report Writing workshops to a new client. Because it’s the first time I’m delivering a full workshop(s) to them, it’s important that I get it right.

I’ve invested time getting to know the client and their staff, I’ve tailored the training material to their audit methodology, and I’ve gotten the stamp of approval from the Head of Internal Audit to deliver the workshops.

There’s one thing left to do before I go ‘on stage’: make sure I am ready to seamlessly move from one key message to the next, change from one slide to the next, and transition from topic to topic.

Here are 7 of the strategies I use to prepare myself for any presentation or speech, which I share in more detail in my Preparing Powerful Content workshop:

  1. Plan the first section of your presentation carefully. I still do it for my Audit Report Writing workshop, even though I’ve delivered it well over 50 times.
  2. Identify the relevant aspects of your experience and qualifications to resonate with that particular audience. This will create instant credibility during your self-introduction.
  3. Plan the key messages for every slide. Include supporting anecdote/example/comparison, and timing.
  4. Identify the ‘Ah-a moment’ of each slide in the body of your presentation. If there isn’t one, don’t show the slide.
  5. Plan the transitions between slides and topics. Use signposting language to take your audience by the hand with you.
  6. Know what you can cut out per slide and overall. Flexibility is key, and the audience shouldn’t feel that you are cutting anything out even if you are.
  7. Plan your conclusion. Skip the ‘Thank you for your attention’ slide and instead, focus on your main messages and call to action.

Why choreograph your next presentation?

When you are clear on these things, you can deliver with confidence and authenticity. Planning may take you 5 minutes, 50 minutes or 5 hours. Regardless, you will be far more successful, and your audience is much more likely to benefit from your messages if your choreography is mapped out before you put on your dancing shoes and step onto the stage.

Wishing you much success in your next presentation, speech or workshop!

All the best,

Tracie

Quality Assurance Communication

Create a communication playbook to get better results

“Tracie, I’m frustrated. At meetings, I need to get agreement from my business partners, and it’s just not happening, or the process is lengthy and painful. How can I get better results from my meetings?”

This was one of the questions that was posed to me at the beginning of my Global Communication Competence workshop last week. Almost every workshop participant was nodding their head in unison as Mark asked the question.

It’s a common pain point: We spend so much time in meetings, discussing back and forth, often not really hearing what the other is saying. And as a result, no one actually gets ‘their’ desired outcome.

There is a host of things you can do before, during and after a meeting to support an outcome that suits all or most stakeholders. One of my favorites is making sure your communication playbook is updated and in order before the meeting. That way you can reference it during the meeting exactly when you need to.

What is a communication playbook?

An easy way to understand a communication playbook is to think about a sports playbook. If you’ve ever watched an NFL football game, you’ll be familiar with the concept.

A playbook is a collection of ‘plays’ or tactics that cover possible situations that the team wants to execute or react to on the football field. The plays in the book include common plays that are used quite often, and other plays that are used less frequently but are useful to get the football down the field in tricky situations.

Your communication playbook should include tactics and strategies for common communication interactions and challenging situations that might arise.

In Mark’s case, his communication playbook should include how to prepare for meetings where he has to get agreement with stakeholders, whether that agreement is on recommendations, audit findings, or next steps.

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What should you include in your communication playbook?

Your personal communication playbook is just that: personal. You decide what to include and in how much detail. You decide if it is written in a notebook, on your computer, on the back of an envelope, or is only in your head.

At a minimum, I recommend addressing common communication interactions in your communication playbook, as in Mark’s case above.

To help Mark get started, I proposed he add the following aspects to each play in his communication playbook, and then add relevant questions for each aspect. I’ve given you a couple of examples to get started:

  1. Stakeholders
    Who are the stakeholders in the meeting?
    What do I know about each stakeholder? Include both personal and professional details.
  2. Objectives
    What is my objective for the meeting?
    What do I think their objective is?
  3. Positioning
    What is my position?
    What do I think their position is?
  4. Objections
    What might their objections be? List each objection.
    How can I overcome each objection?
  5. Team
    Who is on my team with me?
    What role will each of us play?

How can you benefit most from your communication playbook?

Prepare for each situation by first looking at existing plays in your communication playbook to determine which would best apply. But don’t forget that every communication interaction is slightly different: different business partners, different topics, different goals, different conditions and different consequences.

It’s a good idea to consult your playbook and then reflect on this particular situation. Decide how you might use the identified differences to create a different strategy, and likely a better outcome, than if you apply the same strategy to every communication interaction.

Wishing you every success as you develop and use your communication playbook!

All the best,

Tracie Marquardt

Quality Assurance Communication

P.S: Start 2018 the RIGHT way! Mark your calendar: My open webinar How to Write a Persuasive Audit Report will take place on January 9, 2018, at 18:00 CET. You’ll learn strategies and techniques that I’ve shared with thousands of audit professionals around the world. So save the date in your calendar TODAY. A registration link will follow in my next Up Your Impact newsletter.

7 Ways to Get Better Results from Small Talk and Networking

Love it or hate it, networking is a valuable way to move yourself and your business forward.

And the more you network, the more you will network. I’m a believer, two years after starting my own business and putting myself and what I am passionate about out into the world every day.

What I’ve learned is that one connection leads to another. These connections can lead to helping someone else achieve their goals, aligning myself with a new colleague to create inspired collaboration, meeting my perfect customer, and signing contracts that benefit both my new clients and me.

Some results of networking are achieved almost immediately. Others can take quite some time to realize. Either way, it’s all worth it. And that’s why we need to keep refining our small talk and networking skills.  With that in mind, here are 7 ways to get better results from networking events:

1. Understand WHY you are networking.

Trying to sell a specific product or service at a networking event can start you off on the wrong foot right from the get-go. Attend a networking event to meet people, listen, learn and add value.

2. Don’t be a shark.

We all want SOMETHING from our networking efforts. It’s how we go about getting ‘the something’ that matters. Your communication skills, your empathy and your authenticity will contribute to your success. (And don’t forget your sunny, engaging personality.)

3. Put your excellent communication skills to work.

The ability to present yourself, the skill of active listening, the art of asking questions, the insight of sharing relevant experiences …  All of these will help you navigate a networking event successfully.

4. If you aren’t enjoying yourself, fake it.

Confession: I used to hate networking. I wasn’t comfortable, I wasn’t sure what to say or ask, and frankly, I couldn’t get out of there fast enough. Thankfully, I’ve grown into ‘the networking skill’. Now, I have a hard time finding a downside to networking.

5. Make sure you follow up in a timely manner.

If you’ve promised to send someone a document, tip or book recommendation, do it the next day. You are fresh in their minds, and following up right away will reinforce the know-like-and-trust factor. This is easier if you have made notes on their business card or in a small notebook during your discussion.

6. Do a bit of research before you go.

Who is sponsoring the event and why? Who is attending? Doctors, lawyers, auto mechanics or astrophysicists? What do they need to be successful? Put yourself in their shoes before you go, and be ready to ask questions and really listen to the answers.

7. Learn the art of small talk.

Small talk gives us an opportunity to share a bit about ourselves while determining if we have common interests that encourage further exploration. If you are new at networking, prepare one or two opening lines and probing questions to get you started. The more you practice, the better and more natural you will become. And you don’t want to kill the conversation before it even starts.

What are your secrets to being a successful networker? Share them in the comments below. We can always learn from each other.

All the best,

Tracie Marquardt

Quality Assurance Communication